How to Report Crypto Losses On Your Taxes CryptoTrader.Tax

Can I trade with someone else’s money with limited power of attorney and get paid for it?

[USA] So I’ve been given an interesting opportunity. Just for a little bit of background info, I’ve been trading in the stock market for my own personal gain for a while now and have a decent track record. Nothing insane (or as risky) as what you see on /wallstreetbets, but consistently profiting via day trading and short-term momentum swings.
I trade in an online options trading community, and someone has approached me with a desire to grant me power of attorney for their account. We have had video calls, I can verify the person is in fact who they say they are, as they have quite a social media presence. They have specifically requested me to trade options (my primary instrument), with an account balance of $350,000. This individual is a business owner (owns a gambling company) with a net worth in the 7 figures. They proposed a % split of profits that they will send via bank wire or bitcoin and said they’re okay with signing a form that essentially says “I, __, hereby acknowledge and understand the risks of options trading and I won’t pursue @ilovetablesandchairs for any damages.” FWIW I live in the USA and they live in Asia.
Here’s what my interpretation is of the law: with power of attorney, I’m legally allowed to manage the account provided I’m investing in a ‘safe’ manner. Despite options being an inherently risky investment, I play small position sizes on high probably breaks of support and resistance and take profits every 10% (if that made sense to you, then you understand just how conservative that is.) They have requested even more risk - remember, they own a gambling company - to quote them, "my appetite for risk is considerable." They have also said "If the account goes to 0, I'm no worse off. Trade as if it were your own account & do what you're good at, I have full faith in your ability."
If I’m wrong with my interpretation of power of attorney in regards to brokerage accounts and active trading, the fun ends here.
If I’m correct in my understanding of power of attorney, the next issues are me being paid and my liability for losses. Starting with the latter, is the other party acknowledging the risks of the account and stating it’s “throwaway” money enough to cover me in the case of an unexpected market downturn? In regards to getting paid, I understand I need a series 7 to be a licensed financial advisor in the states if I’m soliciting outside investors and receiving compensation. Seeing as this is a friend I believe I’m exempt. Will I be fine getting paid a % of realized profits at the end of each month (with taxes paid).
I'd appreciate any advice on the matter, strictly related to the legality & not the inherent risk involved - for that I am well aware.
submitted by ilovetablesandchairs to legaladvice [link] [comments]

Wandering From the Path? | Monthly Portfolio Update - August 2020

Midway along the journey of our life I woke to find myself in a dark wood, for I had wandered off from the straight path.
Dante, The Divine Comedy: Inferno, Canto I
This is my forty-fifth portfolio update. I complete this update monthly to check my progress against my goal.
Portfolio goal
My objective is to reach a portfolio of $2 180 000 by 1 July 2021. This would produce a real annual income of about $87 000 (in 2020 dollars).
This portfolio objective is based on an expected average real return of 3.99 per cent, or a nominal return of 6.49 per cent.
Portfolio summary
Total portfolio value $1 848 896 (+$48 777 or 2.7%)
Asset allocation
Presented visually, below is a high-level view of the current asset allocation of the portfolio.
[Chart]
Comments
The portfolio has increased in value for the fifth consecutive month, and is starting to approach the monthly value last reached in January.
The portfolio has grown over $48 000, or 2.7 per cent this month, reflecting the strong market recovery since late March
[Chart]
The growth in the portfolio was broadly-based across global and Australian equities, with an increase of around 3.8 per cent. Following strong previous rises, gold holdings decreased by around 2.2 per cent, while Bitcoin continued to increase in value (by 2.5 per cent).
Combined, the value of gold and Bitcoin holdings remain at a new peak, while total equity holdings are still below their late January peak to the tune of around $50 000. The fixed income holdings of the portfolio continue to fall below the target allocation.
[Chart]
The expanding value of gold and Bitcoin holdings since January last year have actually had the practical effect of driving new investments into equities, since effectively for each dollar of appreciation, for example, my target allocation to equities rises by seven dollars.
New investments this month have been in the Vanguard international shares exchange-traded fund (VGS) and the Australian shares equivalent (VAS). These have been directed to bring my actual asset allocation more closely in line with the target split between Australian and global shares set out in the portfolio plan.
As the exchange traded funds such as VGS, VAS and Betashares A200 now make up nearly 30 per cent of the overall portfolio, the quarterly payments they provide have increased in magnitude and importance. Early in the journey, third quarter distributions were essentially immaterial events.
Using the same 'median per unit' forecast approach as recently used for half yearly forecasts would suggest a third quarter payout due at the end of September of around $6000. Due to significant announced dividend reductions across this year I am, however, currently assuming this is likely to be significantly lower, and perhaps in the vicinity of $4000 or less.
Finding true north: approach to achieving a set asset allocation
One of the choices facing all investors with a preferred asset allocation is how strictly the target is applied over time, and what variability is acceptable around that. There is a significant body of financial literature around that issue.
My own approach has been to seek to target the preferred asset allocation dynamically, through buying the asset class that is furthest from its target, with new portfolio contributions, and re-investment of paid out distributions.
As part of monitoring asset allocation, I also track a measure of 'absolute' variance, to understand at a whole of portfolio level how far it is from the desired allocation.
This is the sum of the absolute value of variances (e.g. so that being 3 per cent under target in shares, and 7 per cent over target in fixed interest will equal an absolute variance of 10 per cent under this measure).
This measure is currently sitting near its highest level in around 2 years, at 15.0 per cent, as can be seen in the chart below.
[Chart]
The dominant reason for this higher level of variance from target is significant appreciation in the price of gold and Bitcoin holdings.
Mapping the sources of portfolio variances
Changes in target allocations in the past makes direct comparisons problematic, but previous peaks of the variance measure matches almost perfectly past Bitcoin price movements.
For a brief period in January 2018, gold and Bitcoin combined constituted 20 per cent, or 1 in 5 dollars of the entire portfolio. Due to the growth in other equity components of the portfolio since this level has not been subsequently exceeded.
Nonetheless, it is instructive to understand that the dollar value of combined gold and Bitcoin holdings is actually up around $40 000 from that brief peak. With the larger portfolio, this now means they together make up 17.2 per cent of the total portfolio value.
Tacking into the wind of portfolio movements?
The logical question to fall out from this situation is: to what extent should this drive an active choice to sell down gold and Bitcoin until they resume their 10 per cent target allocation?
This would currently imply selling around $130 000 of gold or Bitcoin, and generating a capital gains tax liability of potentially up to $27 000. Needless to say this is not an attractive proposition. Several other considerations lead me to not make this choice:
This approach is a departure from a mechanistic implementation of an asset allocation rule. Rather, the approach I take is pragmatic.
Tracking course drift in the portfolio components
As an example, I regularly review whether a significant fall in Bitcoin prices to its recent lows would alter my monthly decision on where to direct new investments. So far it does not, and the 'signal' continues to be to buy new equities.
Another tool I use is a monthly measurement of the absolute dollar variance of Australian and global shares, as well as fixed interest, from their ideal target allocations.
The chart below sets this out for the period since January 2019. A positive value effectively represents an over-allocation to a sector, a negative value, an under-allocation compared to target.
[Chart]
This reinforces the overall story that, as gold and Bitcoin have grown in value, there emerges a larger 'deficit' to the target. Falls in equities markets across February and March also produce visibly larger 'dollar gaps' to the target allocation.
This graph enables a tracking of the impact of portfolio gains or losses, and volatility, and a better understanding of the practical task of returning to target allocations. Runaway lines in either direction would be evidence that current approaches for returning to targets were unworkable, but so far this does not appear to be the case.
A crossing over: a credit card FI milestone
This month has seen a long awaited milestone reached.
Calculated on a past three year average, portfolio distributions now entirely meet monthly credit card expenses. This means that every credit card purchase - each shopping trip or online purchase - is effectively paid for by average portfolio distributions.
At the start of this journey, distributions were only equivalent to around 40 per cent of credit card expenses. As time has progressed distributions have increased to cover a larger and larger proportion of card expenses.
[Chart]
Most recently, with COVID-19 related restrictions having pushed card expenditure down further, the remaining gap to this 'Credit Card FI' target has closed.
Looked at on an un-smoothed basis, expenditures on the credit card have continued to be slightly lower than average across the past month. The below chart details the extent to which portfolio distributions (red) cover estimated total expenses (green), measured month to month.
[Chart]
Credit card expenditure makes up around 80 per cent of total spending, so this is not a milestone that makes paid work irrelevant or optional. Similarly, if spending rises as various travel and other restrictions ease, it is possible that this position could be temporary.
Equally, should distributions fall dramatically below long term averages in the year ahead, this could result in average distributions falling faster than average monthly card expenditure. Even without this, on a three year average basis, monthly distributions will decline as high distributions received in the second half of 2017 slowly fall out of the estimation sample.
For the moment, however, a slim margin exists. Distributions are $13 per month above average monthly credit card bills. This feels like a substantial achievement to note, as one unlooked for at the outset of the journey.
Progress
Progress against the objective, and the additional measures I have reached is set out below.
Measure Portfolio All Assets
Portfolio objective – $2 180 000 (or $87 000 pa) 84.8% 114.6%
Credit card purchases – $71 000 pa 103.5% 139.9%
Total expenses – $89 000 pa 82.9% 112.1%
Summary
What feels like a long winter is just passed. The cold days and weeks have felt repetitive and dominated by a pervasive sense of uncertainty. Yet through this time, this wandering off, the portfolio has moved quite steadily back towards it previous highs. That it is even approaching them in the course of just a few months is unexpected.
What this obscures is the different components of growth driving this outcome. The portfolio that is recovering, like the index it follows, is changing in its underlying composition. This can be seen most starkly in the high levels of variance from the target portfolio sought discussed above.
It is equally true, however, of individual components such as international equity holdings. In the case of the United States the overall index performance has been driven by share price growth in just a few information technology giants. Gold and Bitcoin have emerged from the shadows of the portfolio to an unintended leading role in portfolio growth since early 2019.
This month I have enjoyed reading the Chapter by Chapter release of the Aussie FIRE e-book coordinated by Pearler. I've also been reading posts from some newer Australian financial independence bloggers, Two to Fire, FIRE Down Under, and Chasing FIRE Down Under.
In podcasts, I have enjoyed the Mad Fientist's update on his fourth year of financial freedom, and Pat and Dave's FIRE and Chill episodes, including an excellent one on market timing fallacies.
The ASX Australian Investor Study 2020 has also been released - setting out some broader trends in recent Australian investment markets, and containing a snapshot of the holdings, approaches and views of everyday investors. This contained many intriguing findings, such as the median investment portfolio ($130 000), its most frequent components (direct Australian shares), and how frequently portfolios are usually checked - with 61 per cent of investors checking their portfolios at least once a month.
This is my own approach also. Monthly assessments allow me to gauge and reflect on how I or elements of the portfolio may have wandered off the straight way in the middle of the journey. Without this, the risk is that dark woods and bent pathways beckon.
The post, links and full charts can be seen here.
submitted by thefiexpl to fiaustralia [link] [comments]

Digital Dollar, FedNow, CBDC, the central banks spending and global push for more control through digital currency.

At the beginning of the Covid-19 outbreak a few interesting things happened. China introduced the "Digital Yuan / RMB" And in April the "Digital dollar" was proposed in the first stimulus bill here in the USA. And they haven't stopped talking about it since. High tables from the White house Financial committee, Federal Reserve, US congress. Aiming to have a digital currency working as early as 2021 to provide UBI / Universal basic income to the masses, all while being able to track, freeze, limit, manipulate spending throughout the economy. Starting to sound rather like a "Black mirror film" isn't it? Well...China has taken it a step farther with their "Social Credit system" watching and controlling nearly every aspect of life. . . but we're here to talk about currency. How could this even happen in America? Well, to start
All of the above is a partial list of factors devaluing the Dollar and trust in it from several ways and views. At the end of the day it has a huge amount of enemies, that are all looking for ways to get out of it.
Some of what I'm seeing personally.
It is a death spiral for the working person, where it used to be "No more than 30% of your wage going to housing" It is now well over 50%....Just look at this recent post in Frugal https://www.reddit.com/Frugal/comments/ifqah1/is_it_normal_for_a_third_to_a_half_of_you?utm_source=share&utm_medium=web2x&context=3
This death spiral I foresee getting worse. And historically any "tax" / regulation cost will just be passed down to the consumer in form of increased prices until people / businesses move elsewhere as we've seen in several cities around the US.

So what can we do? Buy Gold! Silver! Bitcoin! Stocks! I hear people roar, They aren't exactly wrong as history shows... but have you considered the 30-40% tax on the "gain"? Even when that asset buys the same value before tax? What if the government makes it illegal like the 1933 order: 6102 Where you couldn't own gold for nearly 50 years? You're frozen out, or even out on taxes (which will likely be more strict and controlled later in time).
I'd say Invest in things that will
Metals are the next step when a person has plenty of the above. You get to a point where you have hundreds of thousands, if not millions that you need to condense into something real.
It is all about the savings or productivity gain of the investment. For instance I would wager that many preppers have gotten more use / value out of a $800 clothes washer than a $800 rifle. (have you ever had to do manual laundry???) Sure the rifle will hold value...but it often doesn't pay you back with time / what it saved and / or what it has produced during its life unless you are using it. Same can be said of security cameras, a generator, a tractor, trailer, garden, tools, ect.
Look at history even, in countries that have experienced hyperinflation people that already had tangibles they regularly use were way ahead. It could even be honey, a tool, extra maintenance parts, can of food, that bottle of medicine, a computer to keep your intel on point, (cough # PrepperIntel plug) use of your equipment to do or make something for someone. Real Estate is good too, it rides inflation well and has many ways of being productive.
Your metals could be sitting there like the rifle, and could be subject to hot debate and laws. Meanwhile that garden is paying back, chainsaw is helping saw up wood, or your tractor is helping a job, your tools just helped you fix something / saved you much loss, Your security stopped a loss not by a person, but an random animal stealing things. Or that $25,000 solar array is paying you back by the day in spades...while making you independent...running all your tools you're using to make things to sell, and even heating / cooling some of the house with the extra juice while places around you experience rolling blackouts. You were even smart and took the current 24% tax benefit the government has saving you $5000 on it for batteries. Don't get me started if you have an electric vehicle with solar... I'm rambling at this point...and all those stealthy / direct and passive background savings...even if the crap doesn't hit the fan.
So anyways, With out of control central banks and big governments, digital currencies, How do you think it will play out? Are we heading to dystopia?
submitted by AntiSonOfBitchamajig to PrepperIntel [link] [comments]

Received 6174-A from IRS recently. Worried on how to proceed ?

I declared that I have bought virtual currency in 2019 tax return. I never traded or even withdraw anything that I bought from 2019.
Letter didn't specify any year in it . It says that I may need to report crypto currency transactions. Its so generic letter that Im worried. Here is my situation. I traded virtual currencies primarily in 2015 and 2016. I used coinbase for buying bitcoing and ether mostly. I did store some of them and I have those even now. I will pay taxes on those when i sell. Rest of bitcoins I spend it within few days/weeks of buying it. I spend it mostly on buying things online , gift cards and even in local shops(for beer and food). But the problem is I don't have proper receipt on when and how I spend those as I used multiple wallets and lost track of the keys to some.
One more thing, I gifted bitcoin to few family members bitcoin as well probably like $2000 in total. Does gifting bitcoin cause any complications?
Checking coinbase account i traded, I bought close to $10k in total bought bitcoin or ether during those 2 yrs. Coinbase does have history of sell ( time i withdraw bitcoin to my wallet or used to pay stuff online). If I use those buy and sell just from coinbase , it tells i have loss of $10 combined.
I am not sure how to proceed here. Should I ignore the letter as I didn't really have any profit or loss ?
submitted by AfternoonOrder to tax [link] [comments]

Crypto Weekly News

Cryptocurrencies
Bitcoin Is About To See Its Largest Quarterly Options Expiry Ever
One factor that could contribute to cryptocurrency instability shortly is the inevitable expiration of 87,000 quarterly BTC options contracts. Traders who roll back these positions or close them before the close may cause some turbulence.
Ripple Expands Partnership With Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Via Mojaloop
India's leading digital payment platforms PhonePe and Ripple have joined as sponsor members. As a sponsor, Ripple will contribute to the development of strategic vision, corporate governance, and technical guidance to ensure the long-term health and growth of the Mojaloop open source community.
IOTA: First SOCIETY2 Product Will Be Available To Use Very Soon
As announced, Secrets will be a messaging app that will allow its users to send private peer-to-peer messages and add users to a private group. The first product of the ecosystem is in the final stages of development.
IOTA: Eclipse Foundation Makes First Commit For Tangle Marketplace Project
The Tangle Marketplace received its first commit from the Eclipse Foundation. As part of a collaboration between IOTA and the Tangle EE Working Group, the project aims to advance use cases in the digital economy through the IOTA Tangle. Besides, the team is also developing the Unified Identity project.
SUSHI Faces Massive Sell-Off Following Uniswap’s Token Launch
SUSHI was among the worst-performing cryptocurrencies this week. This is because Uniswap launched its UNI token. Sushiswap fell just over 16% in 24 hours. On Thursday alone, the SUSHI/USD exchange rate fell more than 10%, trading at $1.357 per token.
Projects and Updates
BitMart Exchange Partners With Top Cybersecurity Solutions Provider
The partnership with cybersecurity firm Hacken should make cryptocurrency trading more secure. BitMart Exchange calls the new development a revolutionary innovation. The new technology will monitor the security of the platform while ensuring that the site is resilient to future hacking attempts.
VeChain Presents VerifyCar At BMW Group’s ‘Digital Innovation Day’
The blockchain-based platform will collect vehicle data such as mileage, repairs, and additional services. The decentralized app will run on the VeChainThor blockchain, which will provide security and data protection. BMW emphasizes that VerifyCar users will have more control over their data.
Bitfinex Adopts Lightning Network’s ‘Wumbo Channels’
The platform has opened three Wumbo Channels to avoid the inherent Lightning Network bandwidth limitations of 0.1677 BTC. Each channel has a limit of 5 BTC. According to representatives of the exchange, these are the largest channels in the Lightning Network.
Binance Creates ‘Innovation Zone’ To Let Only Select Users Trade New DeFi Tokens
Binance is positioning the new service as a safe haven for trading high volatility DeFi assets. Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao noted that the platform needs to add new popular tokens to remain competitive.
KuCoin Establishes Strategic Partnership With Poloniex To Elevate Digital Asset Exchange Industry
The initiative involves the creation of a research organization. Representatives of the sites note that the cooperation will help them make the most of the opportunities of the cryptography and blockchain industry.
Hacking
KuCoin Group Issues A Warning About Phishing Sites
Users are warned that kucoin-exchange.net is not affiliated with KuCoin Group and is a fraudulent domain. To avoid these types of scams, users are asked to be careful and avoid links from domains similar to the official ones.
Twitter Tightens Security Ahead Of US Presidential Election
Additional measures include stronger passwords, password reset protection, and two-factor authentication. The service will also update the internal system to quickly respond to suspicious activity.
Korean Police Summon Bithumb Chairman For Fraud Investigations
According to the police, Lee Jung Hoon organized a pre-sale of the native Bithumb BXA token, which never made it to the listing. The estimated damage to investors was around 30 billion won (~$25 million). The second charge is related to the overseas real estate of the chairman of the exchange. Law enforcement agencies speculate that Hoon was tax evasive.
Australian Man Caught Mining On Supercomputers Avoids Jail
In 2018, Jonathan Khoo worked as a contractor for the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). Using two government supercomputers, he mined Ethereum and Monero worth almost $6,897 in a month. Mining cost the agency $56,133. The man faced 10 years in prison, but the judge took into account his confession, loss of a job, and no criminal record. Khoo was assigned 300 hours of community service and psychological counseling.
That’s all for now! For more details follow us on Twitter, subscribe to our YouTube channel, join our Telegram.
submitted by CoinjoyAssistant to u/CoinjoyAssistant [link] [comments]

Crypto Weekly News

Cryptocurrencies
Bitcoin Is About To See Its Largest Quarterly Options Expiry Ever
One factor that could contribute to cryptocurrency instability shortly is the inevitable expiration of 87,000 quarterly BTC options contracts. Traders who roll back these positions or close them before the close may cause some turbulence.
Ripple Expands Partnership With Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Via Mojaloop
India's leading digital payment platforms PhonePe and Ripple have joined as sponsor members. As a sponsor, Ripple will contribute to the development of strategic vision, corporate governance, and technical guidance to ensure the long-term health and growth of the Mojaloop open source community.
IOTA: First SOCIETY2 Product Will Be Available To Use Very Soon
As announced, Secrets will be a messaging app that will allow its users to send private peer-to-peer messages and add users to a private group. The first product of the ecosystem is in the final stages of development.
IOTA: Eclipse Foundation Makes First Commit For Tangle Marketplace Project
The Tangle Marketplace received its first commit from the Eclipse Foundation. As part of a collaboration between IOTA and the Tangle EE Working Group, the project aims to advance use cases in the digital economy through the IOTA Tangle. Besides, the team is also developing the Unified Identity project.
SUSHI Faces Massive Sell-Off Following Uniswap’s Token Launch
SUSHI was among the worst-performing cryptocurrencies this week. This is because Uniswap launched its UNI token. Sushiswap fell just over 16% in 24 hours. On Thursday alone, the SUSHI/USD exchange rate fell more than 10%, trading at $1.357 per token.
Projects and Updates
BitMart Exchange Partners With Top Cybersecurity Solutions Provider
The partnership with cybersecurity firm Hacken should make cryptocurrency trading more secure. BitMart Exchange calls the new development a revolutionary innovation. The new technology will monitor the security of the platform while ensuring that the site is resilient to future hacking attempts.
VeChain Presents VerifyCar At BMW Group’s ‘Digital Innovation Day’
The blockchain-based platform will collect vehicle data such as mileage, repairs, and additional services. The decentralized app will run on the VeChainThor blockchain, which will provide security and data protection. BMW emphasizes that VerifyCar users will have more control over their data.
Bitfinex Adopts Lightning Network’s ‘Wumbo Channels’
The platform has opened three Wumbo Channels to avoid the inherent Lightning Network bandwidth limitations of 0.1677 BTC. Each channel has a limit of 5 BTC. According to representatives of the exchange, these are the largest channels in the Lightning Network.
Binance Creates ‘Innovation Zone’ To Let Only Select Users Trade New DeFi Tokens
Binance is positioning the new service as a safe haven for trading high volatility DeFi assets. Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao noted that the platform needs to add new popular tokens to remain competitive.
KuCoin Establishes Strategic Partnership With Poloniex To Elevate Digital Asset Exchange Industry
The initiative involves the creation of a research organization. Representatives of the sites note that the cooperation will help them make the most of the opportunities of the cryptography and blockchain industry.
Hacking
KuCoin Group Issues A Warning About Phishing Sites
Users are warned that kucoin-exchange.net is not affiliated with KuCoin Group and is a fraudulent domain. To avoid these types of scams, users are asked to be careful and avoid links from domains similar to the official ones.
Twitter Tightens Security Ahead Of US Presidential Election
Additional measures include stronger passwords, password reset protection, and two-factor authentication. The service will also update the internal system to quickly respond to suspicious activity.
Korean Police Summon Bithumb Chairman For Fraud Investigations
According to the police, Lee Jung Hoon organized a pre-sale of the native Bithumb BXA token, which never made it to the listing. The estimated damage to investors was around 30 billion won (~$25 million). The second charge is related to the overseas real estate of the chairman of the exchange. Law enforcement agencies speculate that Hoon was tax evasive.
Australian Man Caught Mining On Supercomputers Avoids Jail
In 2018, Jonathan Khoo worked as a contractor for the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). Using two government supercomputers, he mined Ethereum and Monero worth almost $6,897 in a month. Mining cost the agency $56,133. The man faced 10 years in prison, but the judge took into account his confession, loss of a job, and no criminal record. Khoo was assigned 300 hours of community service and psychological counseling.
That’s all for now! For more details follow us on Twitter, subscribe to our YouTube channel, join our Telegram.
submitted by CoinjoyAssistant to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

Crypto tax planning

Hello and sorry if this has been asked. I searched through old posts and couldn’t find anything to answer all my tax questions regarding crypto.
Since realized gains and losses are year to year, does it make sense to sell December 31 and buy back in the next day?
Since crypto to crypto trades are taxable events, if I have say 10 ethereum and transfer it to bitcoin but I plan on holding bitcoin for a long time, I have to sell part of it to pay the taxes on any gain incurred on the ethereum right?
If I’m looking at getting a dual [tax] citizenship in another country so I don’t get murdered on crypto taxes, does that just look at the taxes going forward from the day the citizenship is issued?
submitted by mistermoneymustache to tax [link] [comments]

Crypto Weekly News — September, 25

Cryptocurrencies

Bitcoin Is About To See Its Largest Quarterly Options Expiry Ever
One factor that could contribute to cryptocurrency instability shortly is the inevitable expiration of 87,000 quarterly BTC options contracts. Traders who roll back these positions or close them before the close may cause some turbulence.
Ripple Expands Partnership With Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Via Mojaloop
India's leading digital payment platforms PhonePe and Ripple have joined as sponsor members. As a sponsor, Ripple will contribute to the development of strategic vision, corporate governance, and technical guidance to ensure the long-term health and growth of the Mojaloop open source community.
IOTA: First SOCIETY2 Product Will Be Available To Use Very Soon
As announced, Secrets will be a messaging app that will allow its users to send private peer-to-peer messages and add users to a private group. The first product of the ecosystem is in the final stages of development.
IOTA: Eclipse Foundation Makes First Commit For Tangle Marketplace Project
The Tangle Marketplace received its first commit from the Eclipse Foundation. As part of a collaboration between IOTA and the Tangle EE Working Group, the project aims to advance use cases in the digital economy through the IOTA Tangle. Besides, the team is also developing the Unified Identity project.
SUSHI Faces Massive Sell-Off Following Uniswap’s Token Launch
SUSHI was among the worst-performing cryptocurrencies this week. This is because Uniswap launched its UNI token. Sushiswap fell just over 16% in 24 hours. On Thursday alone, the SUSHI/USD exchange rate fell more than 10%, trading at $1.357 per token.

Projects and Updates

BitMart Exchange Partners With Top Cybersecurity Solutions Provider
The partnership with cybersecurity firm Hacken should make cryptocurrency trading more secure. BitMart Exchange calls the new development a revolutionary innovation. The new technology will monitor the security of the platform while ensuring that the site is resilient to future hacking attempts.
VeChain Presents VerifyCar At BMW Group’s ‘Digital Innovation Day’
The blockchain-based platform will collect vehicle data such as mileage, repairs, and additional services. The decentralized app will run on the VeChainThor blockchain, which will provide security and data protection. BMW emphasizes that VerifyCar users will have more control over their data.
Bitfinex Adopts Lightning Network’s ‘Wumbo Channels’
The platform has opened three Wumbo Channels to avoid the inherent Lightning Network bandwidth limitations of 0.1677 BTC. Each channel has a limit of 5 BTC. According to representatives of the exchange, these are the largest channels in the Lightning Network.
Binance Creates ‘Innovation Zone’ To Let Only Select Users Trade New DeFi Tokens
Binance is positioning the new service as a safe haven for trading high volatility DeFi assets. Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao noted that the platform needs to add new popular tokens to remain competitive.
KuCoin Establishes Strategic Partnership With Poloniex To Elevate Digital Asset Exchange Industry
The initiative involves the creation of a research organization. Representatives of the sites note that the cooperation will help them make the most of the opportunities of the cryptography and blockchain industry.

Hacking

KuCoin Group Issues A Warning About Phishing Sites
Users are warned that kucoin-exchange.net is not affiliated with KuCoin Group and is a fraudulent domain. To avoid these types of scams, users are asked to be careful and avoid links from domains similar to the official ones.
Twitter Tightens Security Ahead Of US Presidential Election
Additional measures include stronger passwords, password reset protection, and two-factor authentication. The service will also update the internal system to quickly respond to suspicious activity.
Korean Police Summon Bithumb Chairman For Fraud Investigations
According to the police, Lee Jung Hoon organized a pre-sale of the native Bithumb BXA token, which never made it to the listing. The estimated damage to investors was around 30 billion won (~$25 million). The second charge is related to the overseas real estate of the chairman of the exchange. Law enforcement agencies speculate that Hoon was tax evasive.
Australian Man Caught Mining On Supercomputers Avoids Jail
In 2018, Jonathan Khoo worked as a contractor for the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). Using two government supercomputers, he mined Ethereum and Monero worth almost $6,897 in a month. Mining cost the agency $56,133. The man faced 10 years in prison, but the judge took into account his confession, loss of a job, and no criminal record. Khoo was assigned 300 hours of community service and psychological counseling.
That’s all for now! For more details follow us on Twitter, subscribe to our YouTube channel, join our Telegram.
submitted by CoinjoyAssistant to u/CoinjoyAssistant [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to conspiracy [link] [comments]

Economic Stimulus and Cryptocurrency (Podcast Episode and Summary)

Hey All!
I’m Isa, producer of The Bitcoin Taxes Podcast and I want to share some valuable information with you. Our newest episode is out today and this time we discuss economic stimulus and cryptocurrency, a topic I think might be of your interest.
Our guest this time is Andrew. Andrew Gordon is a cryptocurrency tax lawyer and the managing attorney of Gordon Law Group. Andrew concentrates on tax controversy and compliance, crypto, and business law – which makes him uniquely suited to discuss how cryptocurrency users may be affected by the economic stimulus options made available in response to COVID-19.
Andrew joins our show to discuss these economic relief measures, and how cryptocurrency traders and businesses can benefit from them. We also discuss what role cryptocurrency has played in this relief response. In addition, Andrew updates us on any changes regarding the FBAR and FATCA filings since his last time on the show.
Episode Page
Audio Only
Episode highlights

FBAR and FATCA Filings: A Reminder (01:35)

Andrew: The FBAR and FATCA are different forms, but both of them are concerned with disclosing the maximum value that you had in the account at any time during the year. They’re not asking for gains or losses – it’s just a disclosure, meaning that there’s no tax calculation. The IRS simply wants to know what is the maximum amount that you had in that account. As long as you disclose and disclose timely, there aren’t any penalties, there isn’t any tax.

Economic Stimulus Programs (05:58)

Andrew: There’s been a lot of different stimulus programs that are available for small businesses, sole proprietors, and so a lot of different people in crypto and even those with businesses outside crypto have been reaching out to us asking: are there different programs that we can take advantage of? How do we take advantage of this? What makes sense for us?
The payroll protection program loans, PPP, is one of the best options out there for small businesses. It really is almost like getting free money or a grant from the government and it allows up to eight weeks of payroll, rent, and utilities to be paid to you in a forgivable loan. So it’s originally a loan, but as long as you use it for those purposes, you don’t just stick the money in your pocket, it is forgiven by the government.
There was originally $349 billion that was approved for this program and within days the money was gone. The SBA ran out of money and news reports suggest that probably about 5 to 10% of the people that wanted funds got it in that initial amount. Unfortunately there seems to be suggestions, as you said, that people that have connections or perhaps even larger companies are getting these loans, but there are things that small businesses, that people listening to this can do and should do, to take advantage of these loans.

Stimulus Options for Crypto Traders (09:37)

Andrew: Some of these other programs do apply to crypto traders. Some of the people out there listening are crypto traders, which is different than [being an] investor.
If you are trading daily, regularly, and it’s really a business, you may be filing your tax return as a trader – which a lot of people may think of themselves as a trader, but in the eyes of the IRS, they’re really investors. This is different because as a trader, you’re essentially a small business and so you’ll be eligible for these same forgivable loans or other loans that any other small business would be eligible for – and you don’t need payroll. That was a big misconception with the payroll protection program loans, [because] it’s got “payroll” in the name.
For people listening out there either as a crypto business, or you just have another business – you’re a schedule C filer on your tax return, and that could be for crypto, or it could be for something else. You can be eligible for a forgivable loan under the payroll protection program. And I’ll fast forward the math for you. If you’re a schedule C business, you can be eligible for a little over $20,000 of forgivable loans. And again, this can be if you’re a crypto trader, it could be if you have a business that’s related to crypto, providing crypto consulting or anything like that, or even something that’s not related to crypto at all.
submitted by IsaN-BitcoinTax to CoronavirusRecession [link] [comments]

Summary of the new IRS guidelines (TLDR include)

Hey all - I know there's a dozen posts about the new crypto tax deadlines - so apologies for making it a dozen plus one.
Full disclosure, I work for Bitcoin.Tax, where this article was published. I've included the link to our summary, as well as our actual summary. Also - I'll be talking with a crypto tax pro on our podcast about these guidelines soon. I usually post links to our podcast on this subreddit, so stay tuned (if you want...) for that in the next few days. Hopefully this helps some folks, as parts of the new guidelines are fairly ambiguous.
Link: https://bitcoin.tax/blog/irs-crypto-tax-faq/
TLDR:
Generally, this is the same as the advice and common practice used by taxpayers and accountants. Although, the exception here is the clarification of the specific identification rule. We'll talk about that below.
Summary:
The IRS has issued their long-awaited guidance on the tax treatment for cryptocurrencies. You can read their FAQ On Virtual Currency Transactions on the IRS website.
This is the first official guidance since the original 2014-21 notice in April 2014.

IRS Cryptocurrency Tax FAQ

We have gone into more detail for some of the main points in their FAQ.

Hard forks and airdrops

Despite peculiar wording by the IRS, they have confirmed that receipt of crypto from an airdrop or fork is to be treated as income, and so subject to income tax.
ordinary income equal to the fair market value of the new cryptocurrency when it is received, which is when the transaction is recorded on the distributed ledger, provided you have dominion and control over the cryptocurrency so that you can transfer, sell, exchange, or otherwise dispose of the cryptocurrency
However, these drops typically have no market (perhaps a futures market) until they have existed for a period of time, so establishing a value could be difficult. It is possible that the value could be zero right at that exact moment it is recorded on the distributed ledger.
In order to receive income, you must have dominion and control over these new crypto. This effectively means you must be able to manage it; typically you would have the private keys or it is immediately available in a custodial wallet or online account, e.g. Coinbase.
If the crypto doesn't appear in your wallet, or you don't get control of it until a later date, then that later date is used to calculated the USD income value.
This had been a common question among crypto traders: if BTC was forked off into a new "BTC" coin, which you might not even have been aware of, do you still have income? The answer is no. Unless, you subsequently get access to those new coins, in which case you do have income on the date you receive control.
When you have income for an airdrop or fork, this also sets the cost basis (value and date) for any subsequent capital gains calculations.

Fair Market Value (FMV)

FMV is used to give something a value, i.e. what it's worth. If you list a bike for sale, you might research the prices for which other people are selling. Those prices give a FMV. But it you sell your bike and someone buys it for $100, then the bike's FMV was $100.
With crypto, sometimes we need to know FMV because we are not trading directly for dollars.
For example, if you sell 1 BTC for 150 LTC, you are disposing of the 1 BTC at FMV. You need to know the USD value in order to know the proceeds and to calculate any capital gains or losses.
So, first, if this was traded on an exchange, we use the spot price on the exchange at that time. This is true even if the transaction was off-chain.
However, where no FMV exists, such as a peer-to-peer transaction, then you have to get the value from elsewhere.
So, secondly, use the FMV of the service or product you are exchanging. With the above bike example, say buying it with crypto, the FMV would be that of the bike itself (the price it would have sold for USD).
Lastly, when no value can be obtained, then use a service that provides a consistent worldwide indices value (the IRS are calling this an "explorer" but that is a confusing term as blockchain explorers may not provide a USD value). If you do not use an "explorer" value, you can use an "accurate representation of the cryptocurrency's market value". Much like with fiat, this means using an establish and consistent source.

FIFO and Specific Identification

Advice from most tax preparers and accountants has been to err on the side of caution and go with First-In First-Out (FIFO). Basically, if you bought 1 BTC for $9,000 and later another for $10,000, when you come to sell 1 BTC (or partial) you would use the cost of the first 1 BTC that you had acquired.
This is the default IRS cost basis method and would not be challenged.
Some taxpayers had filed using specific identification, where FIFO was not used and instead the "lot" that was sold was chosen from their wallets. Summary strategies could also be employed, such as Last-In First-Out (LIFO), where the basis of the most recently acquired crypto is used instead.
These other strategies, such as last-in first-out, closest-cost or lowest-cost, often try to minimize the gains per transaction and defer them until later.
This is the biggest change in the new IRS guidance and confirms that specific identification can be used. However, you must be able to document this, which the IRS describes as:
You may identify a specific unit of virtual currency either by documenting the specific unit’s unique digital identifier such as a private key, public key, and address, or by records showing the transaction information for all units of a specific virtual currency, such as Bitcoin, held in a single account, wallet, or address.This information must show (1) the date and time each unit was acquired, (2) your basis and the fair market value of each unit at the time it was acquired, (3) the date and time each unit was sold, exchanged, or otherwise disposed of, and (4) the fair market value of each unit when sold, exchanged, or disposed of, and the amount of money or the value of property received for each unit.
There is no guidance if any extra information should be reported, but it is generally the same information that is added to the 8949 form where capital gains are reported.

Gifts and Donations

Similar to gifts of stocks or property, the rules regarding cost basis have remained unchanged. Received gifts are not immediate income but you do still recognize an capital gains income when you later come to sell, exchange or dispose of the cryptocurrency.
You can use the original basis (with documentation) from the giver in order to make use of long-term gains. However, your received basis becomes the lesser of the giver's cost basis and the FMV of the gift on the date you received it. This is to prevent from gifting losses. Also, if you do not have documentation showing the gift cost basis, then your basis is zero, i.e. you must declare 100% as capital gains.
Donations to registered charities do not recognize income, gains or losses. The value of your charitable donation is the FMV on the date of the gift if you have held the crypto for more than a year. For a year or less, it is lesser of the crypto's cost basis or its FMV on the day of the gift.

What was not mentioned

There are still some key questions and ambiguities that tax professionals have been looking for clarification. For instance, with hard forks and airdrops, if you have the private keys but no software, does that count as control?
Airdrop and forks generally have no markets when they are created, so is there a zero FMV? And should you take the value only when you exercise control?
Can specific identification be used at will or must it be done consistently?
Were 1031 "like-kind" exchanges ever a valid approach before 2018?

Guidance is retroactive

Finally, be aware that IRS guidance is always retroactive, unless otherwise stated, and so should be applied to past and future crypto transactions. If you have not followed these rules then you should consult with your tax professional and may need to file an amendment.
---

Edit:
According to BitcoinTaxesMe:
I clarified a couple of the not mentioned ones with the IRS verbally yesterday. This isn't official guidance, but some insight into what the IRS is thinking:
"For instance, with hard forks and airdrops, if you have the private keys but no software, does that count as control?"
If you the software exists and you don't install it, but could have, it's income, even if installation presents a security risk.
"Airdrop and forks generally have no markets when they are created, so is there a zero FMV? And should you take the value only when you exercise control?"
There's no income recognized until you both have control and there's a way to sell it. So there's no way to take a zero basis, as soon as a market appears it triggers the 2nd prong.
I personally think both of these are insane.
submitted by Sal-BitcoinTax to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

My wife (32F) is threatening to leave me if I (30M) don't get what she considers help for my depression. This isn't the first time she has threatened to leave me.

This is going to be a long post.
I met my wife online 8 years ago. We lived across the country from each other and kept a long distance relationship going well, and go the opportunity to see each other every few months for weeks at a time. We would fall asleep on Skype together every night, text each other throughout the day, and phone each other when we had time to talk or wanted to play games together. In 2013 after a year and a half of dating I asked her to marry me and she said yes.
I was overjoyed! I had spent my highschool years as the guy that everyone avoided because my mother had been sending me to therapy for over 10 years for issues that may have been real at the time of my childhood, but regressed as I grew into adulthood. I would routinely take a cocktail of 8 different medications in the morning and before bed, and my friends are the time would better describe me as a zombie over a functional human being. I had issues holding conversation, would regularly space out, could not perform sexually, and could not get good grades in college. After I got married to my wife, we got an apartment together, and I stopped my medication cold turkey of my own volition.
I was a new man, I no longer any of my previous issues and I felt free and full of life. I never resented my mother because she only had my best interests in mind, and was not doing sending me to therapy and keeping me medicated for her own peace of mind. My parents gave me a great life growing up and gave me everything I ever wanted, being from an upper class household, they bought me a brand new car for college, anything I wanted growing up, and would support me financially on almost anything I wanted within reason. My college was fully paid for and I went to one of the best private schools in the area while growing up. I had been to every continent in the world, visited tons of grand architecture and theme parks, and seen so many wonderful things, and I was looking forward to sharing that life with my new wife.
My wife did not have the upbringing I did. She was the second oldest of 6 children. Growing up, she did not get any luxury. From having to work a summer job to buy her own school supplies and clothes, to dealing with an elder brother that sexually assaulted her every month while her parents slept, to a junkie father that would work odd jobs only to get money to get high, and a mother that worked 3 jobs to keep a roof over her children's head, her child hood was not easy. Her parents got divorced when she was 17, after being together for 23 years. Her father never gave her any love despite her efforts, she would regularly make love notes and lunches for him growing up, only to find them crumpled up and thrown in the trash and never responded to. Her elder brother would force her to give him oral at least a few times a month from the age of 15-16 while everyone in the house was asleep. Her father left and had no contact with her since she was 19, only showing back up in her life for our wedding, just to disappear again. He hasn't spoken to her in 4 years now.
Before we got married, I flew out to meet her, and we packed up everything she owned and put it in her car. We drove 2900 miles across the US to move her into our house with my parents, and after we got married, my parents paid for us to get an apartment near their house. We were so happy! After we moved in together after getting married, we both were young, only 23 and 25. We worked fast food and don't have a lot of money, surviving on only a hundred dollars of food a month. But, because we were together, everything was ok.
Or so I thought. My wife has constantly struggled with insecurity since we got married. We made sure when we got married that we would keep our finances separate. She was a bad money manager and didn't want to "ruin me" like she had ruined herself. She would break down sometimes for no reason begging me not to leave her, and I have never done anything to make it seem like I was. My parents decided that since I had gotten married and was doing OK, they were going to give me part of my inheritance up front. I took this money to pay off all our debt, I paid off half her student loans, and I would take care of any issues that came up for her that she couldn't handle without complaint. She crashed her car, I helped her buy a new one, she couldn't pay a bill, no problem, I've got her covered. Anything she felt she couldn't handle, I was always right there to support her.
Near the end of our first year together, my wife for some reason had reached the end of her rope. If we didn't move out of the big city where she didn't have any friends or know how to get anywhere, she was going to leave me. It wasn't me, but she said was devastatingly homesick, and said she couldn't live here any longer. She had made a real home away from her parents at her college town, and her best friend of 6 years lived there, who had supported her through thick and thin. Despite my aversion to this at first, I could tell that moving back home where her best friend lived and what was familiar to her was important. After 2 weeks of talking about it, I agreed to move with her back to what she considered home. My parents were planning to move around this time as well, as they no longer had any children and we're looking to downsize their home. So, for her, I left my hometown of 25 years, and all my friends that I grew up with.
My parents gave me money for us to buy our first house, and another 30 thousand on top. My wife and I found a nice 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom single family home, and bought it outright with cash. Because there was money left over, we used that for moving costs, and I began searching for a job I knew I would enjoy, while living off the interest on my savings. We were working on having a child and I knew that a kid was going to be expensive, so I was trying to make sure we had the money to support our child, and I could still make my wife happy.
In 2015, 2 years after we moved into our house, my wife said she was going to leave me again. Despite her only ever needing to pay her bills (she had gotten herself into more credit card debt), despite her crashing another car and me paying a $5,000 down payment to buy her another new one (she had to get a loan out), despite me spending time with her every night and never going anywhere without her, taking her on trips and little date nights to make her happy, she was threatening to leave again. A month after her telling me this, my father passed away from early onset Alzheimer's. I was having a rough few months.
We were having trouble conceiving and she was having severe body confidence issues. She was convinced that before I left her for someone else, she was going to have to leave me. Since we had gotten married, she had gained over 100 pounds, and I had never made an issue about it, other than showing concern for her health (her family has a history of diabetes and heart disease). She said that despite me continuing to support her in all her hobbies (she likes dancing and volunteering at the pet shelter), me not having a job was stressing her out because she wasn't sure that I could keep helping her. Despite my reassurances, she believed that I was going to leave her for someone better, and that she needed to leave before I did. No re-assurance I gave her would stop her from believing that I was going to be gone the next time she came home from work.
She started self harming. When she was younger, she frequently thought that the reason that her mother was never around, her father left, her brother abused her, was all her fault. Hurting herself made her feel like she was being punished, and that her sins were being forgiven. Her church growing up was very abusive. They would make people stand up in front of the entire congregation and "confess" their sins in front of everyone. When she had premarital sex with her first boyfriend, she almost killed herself after when her mother found out and made her "confess" to the congregation. She hospitalized herself with a suicide attempt after this happened, and has never respected her mother since.
I called up our PCP and told her that my wife dseperately needed help. After an appointment, blood work, and a CT scan for the issues with concieving, she was diagnosed with Severe Depression, Insulin Resistance, and PCOS. She was put on medication and around this time I had found a job, so I told her that she could cut back on her hours and I would start helping her with her bills. We also started looking for a therapist for her. She started going to the therapist and she seemed a lot happier. We were having fun with friends again, and she felt like the happy, bubbly woman I married again.
In early 2016, we got great news! We were pregnant! Because I was making enough money at the time to pay her bills and mine, she was able to only work 20 hours a week through her pregnancy, and then her job gave her 6 months leave when the baby was due. While she was a few months along, she unfortunately got into another car accident, and so again, I helped her buy a new care, this time a minivan, because she wanted it for our kids. She was going to pay for it again, because she said she was tired of me paying for everything for her again. I have no issues with this as I never have, because whenever I try to pay for something, she doesn't let me.
When we had our child, I had saved up enough money to start my own business. Using the money I had saved, I started up a computer system building company, and servicing the local area, I was able to be home a lot more than working my job, and still make the same amount of money. The business started doing extremely well, and I hired a few employees and a friend of mine to work for me, letting me spend more time with my wife and newborn daughter.
Then, we started having problems again. My wife was in a lot of credit card debt from not managing her money ($30,000), and she had been hiding it from me. She was having issues breastfeeding our kid and would break down for hours at a time over not being able to do it. She was diagnosed with post-partum depression and started going to a different therapist. I wasn't making enough money for paying for our insurance, electrical, car payments, taxes and the credit card debt she had built up. I was upset, but it's extremely uncharacteristic for me to get mad about money, because I have always had money. I offered to use our house savings (we were saving up for a bigger house to have more kids) and pay off her debt again. She said no.
She decided she was going work full time again. I helped her get a debt consolidation loan for her cards, and she began working full time while I took care of our daughter.
This was in the beginning of 2017.
Towards the middle of 2017, our life was going great. My business had taken off, and I was making $10,000 dollars profit a month. I had gotten early in on cryptocurrency back in 2013, and was riding high on the bull run from Bitcoin. My company made crypto mining machines due to having a ton of stock from system building, and we were selling those for record amounts. My wife had cut down to part time because I could afford the extra to help her bills, and she could spend more time with me and our daughter. Things couldn't of been better.
Then in 2018, the crypto market crashed. My cryptocurrency that had been worth almost $500k crashed down to $60k of value in the span of a month and a half. I had to start selling it to pay off debt the company had taken on to expand, or else it was going to hurt me more. But I kept holding onto the majority of it.
I kept my business running, but things were winding down because the crypto run was over. We were operating on razor thin margins. In May of 2018, I stopped paying myself while still running the business to make sure I could keep paying my employees. I was still getting a stipend from investments every month in the amount of a few thousand, so I could afford to not pay myself. I was still taking care of my daughter, but my wife had to go back up to full time. I started looking for jobs, figuring with my 2 associates degrees and my master degree, I could get a good job easy.
In the beginning of 2019, I found out my wife had gotten another $25,000 of credit card debt she was hiding from me. She was eating out daily, bringing home for us to eat, and telling me she was making enough money to afford it. She was now up to almost $45,000 of debt, not including her car. I was upset. I told her she can't keep spending money like we have millions. My business wasn't going well, and we needed to cut back our spending so we can get a bigger house to have another kid like she wants. She broke down again.
She admitted she had a money management issue. She locked all her credit cards up in the house safe, and she agreed to only spend money off her debit card.
Then, the trade wars hit. Our stock account took a huge hit, and because I didn't have strong hands, I sold, at a loss of almost $55,000 dollars. Our stock brokerage trading account that had almost 70k of assets was only worth around $15k dollars. I no longer had the money to cover paying off my wife's debt in an emergency.
In April of 2019, we just received our income taxes, due to my losses from last year, and reduced income, we were due back a large amount. I had unfortunately cut down the business to only myself working for it, as the company still had debt that was used a few years ago to expand to pay off. I still have kept the business operating, unable to pay myself for close to a year now, having to sell crypto to cover bills when business wasn't good enough.
The first day of May, I took this money and put it back in the stock market, but due to weak hands again, I lost 60% of it again before the markets rebounded. The trade wars had taken a ton of my wealth again. Our brokerage account was now worth less than $10k, and I withdrew the rest to put it into my checking account.
Over the past 6 months, I've had to sell off all my remaining cryptocurrency. I have none left. I have to continue running my business in it's dilapidated state, only making enough to pay the bills at the end of the month. I have gotten down to my last $5,000 in cash, and my monthly inheritance stipend, barely pays the bills for the house.
All of the money my wife makes goes to paying off her credit card debt, her student loans, and her car payment. When she comes home, she sits down and plays video games while letting our 3 year old run wild and destroy the house while I sleep. We are trying to potty train, but that's not going well, and when I'm sleeping, our daughter will routinely use the bathroom on the floor then smear it on the walls. My wife will not always notice, and I will wake up having to clean up shit off the walls.
I have been breaking down nonstop. I cannot handle the level of stress I have been having. I have interviewed for 12 jobs in the past 6 months, and not gotten hired. I have applied to over 30. I have lost over $100k of our savings in the past year alone. I never get to see my wife because when she is working, I have to take care of our daughter, and when she gets home, I have to sleep so I can make sure I'm able to work while they are sleeping, because I am unable to work while they're both awake. I make it a priority to make sure I spend a few hours with my wife and daughter a day, so they have time with me.
My wife has not been a responsible adult for months now. She doesn't do her small part of the chores, which is simply do the laundry every week. Every week I take out the trash, clean up the yard, do all the dishes, cook dinner daily, vacuum the house daily, clean up my daughters shit and piss off the floor daily, clean up the mess that my daughter makes when she's playing. We recently found out my daughter is going to need speech therapy. Our house looks like a disaster zone. Our PCP said the speech therapist will come to our house to make it a more "secure environment" for our daughter to get help in. I'm terrified that we're going to get social services called for the state of our house and lose our daughter, but I physically cannot keep up with keeping it clean by myself, because every time I clean something, something else gets destroyed because my wife doesn't watch our daughter.
My wife will throw trash on the floor in the house. She won't pick up dishes. She won't clean up the toys or help our daughter do that when I'm sleeping. There is shit caked on the wall in the nursery because almost every day I can't find it all and clean it all up when my daughter is awake.
I cracked. I cursed at her for the first time in my life. She broke down, she said she's been so stressed and she's trying. I understand how it is to be stressed, I'm stressed too, but I said we need to try harder for our daughter. I told her I don't want to lose her.
Then 2 weeks ago, a text sent late. I'm sure everyone heard about the Verizon bug where texts got send late. You can read about it https://www.theverge.com/2019/11/7/20953422/text-messages-delayed-received-overnight-valentines-day-delay
I had an old text get sent that said "Do you still need me?"
My wife thought I was going to commit suicide.
She said that if I don't get help she's going to leave me and take our daughter with her. She didn't believe me when I showed her the text issue. She says I've been having depression issues for months, and that she's been asking me to get help. She said her therapist has been telling her for months that I need to go get help, and that the idea to threaten to leave me was her THERAPIST'S IDEA, because that threat has MOTIVATED ME BEFORE. This made me extremely upset. I tell her the same thing I did every time, unless they are going to give me a well paying job or hand me a million dollars, therapy is not going to help me.
But I need advice. I love my wife. I have no reason to leave her. In the almost 8 years we've been married, I've never told her I was going to leave her. I pointed this out to her, she still says she can't trust me when I tell her that. I told her why am I being punished for her insecurity. I have done nothing but try to give her a great life. Yes, we've been having a hard time with money for the past year, and I've been very frustrated, but all couples have issues throughout their relationships. She says she doesn't want our daughter growing up hearing her daddy talk about suicide and her maybe hear that.
I'm just trying to figure out how to handle this. I have friends telling me I should leave her. I don't see why I should. I love my wife. I would never leave her, and I feel like now she needs help again. She has gotten happier in person or at least it seems so, but her therapist telling her to threaten me to make me take action seems like a flag for her therapist. But she likes her therapist and likely wouldn't listen if I asked her to find a new one. I asked her to get therapy when she was severely depressed because she didn't seem like the woman I fell in love with anymore. Maybe part of her has come back, but the woman I fell in love with wouldn't be so irresponsible with our daughter, and wouldn't ignore her chores like she does.
I just don't know what to do. I'm scheduled to see our PCP in Janurary for depression, but I don't think it's going to go like she expects, and she hasn't set any expectations of what she's expecting me to get out of this. She says I'm not the man she married any more, but of course I'm not when I'm broke and at the end of my rope with trying to find a job. I feel like anyone would be frustrated and upset if they were in the same position as me. Every day I wake up, work for my failing business that doesn't pay me, take care of my toddler while my wife works, and never get to do anything fun with my family because we have no money and no one will hire me.
I just don't know what to do. I don't want to lose my wife. I have sacrificed so much for her. I want to make her happy. I want my daughter to not have a broken family like my wife had and grow up happy. After her threatening to leave me again, it feels like she doesn't need me anymore. It hurts me severely that she can say that so easily after everything I have done for her. I know she is stressed, and I feel like her saying she's going to leave me helps her cope somehow. I'm resenting her still seeing the same therapist, giving her advice on her home life off my wife's singular perspective. I just don't know what to think anymore.
I want to make the people I love happy.
submitted by ThrowRALovemywife to relationship_advice [link] [comments]

Cost basis/income tax calculations for BAT earned from ads

So, seeing posts like this one around here is making me concerned. If I simply have Brave Rewards enabled in my browser, and nothing more - I'm not registered as a creatopublisher, I'm not verified with Uphold, I haven't in any way cashed out my tokens - what in the heck do and don't I have to report on my 1040 to avoid getting stuck in a perjury trap?
Every website and Reddit commentor seems to have a different answer on this. Some of the answers are more clearly in line with IRS guidance than others but in many cases there is no clear sense to be had of which is "more reasonable" than the others. Yet since I've had Brave Rewards enabled since mid-2019, it behooves me to "get this right" when I fill out my 2019 tax return, lest the IRS come down on me for being inconsistent with my answers should I have better answers to these questions in future years.
The IRS is clear on one thing: cryptocurrency, in general, is valuable property and treated much like gold or other non-dollar capital assets (whether or not they're intended or used primarily as "money"). If your employer pays you in bitcoin (or gold, or a car, or a cow, etc.), you owe taxes on that income the day you receive it, whether or not you "cashed it out" by selling it for dollars. The IRS expects you to compute a "cost basis" for the property you received by determining its current "fair market value" in dollars, and that's what you report on your tax return. If and when you sell that property for dollars at any later date, that's a separate transaction, which may or may not incur a capital gain or loss (difference in value you received from the sale vs. what it was worth when you originally got the property), and that is reported in its own line on the 1040 (separate from ordinary income, depending on whether you held the property more or less than 1 year before selling it).
So far, so good - that's all straightforward enough and well-precedented since it's the same thing people are used to doing for other capital goods such as stocks/bonds, precious metals, or real estate. It's even straightforward for people who simply trade crypto as an investment, like Bitcoin or whatever. In that case it's no different (tax-wise) from trading gold, and if you do it through a broker like Coinbase, Uphold, etc. you'll probably get a nice statement at the end of the year that breaks it all down and you can import into TurboTax or whatever.
That's still well and good for those who (like many here) are trading BAT as an investment, like any other crypto.
But Brave Rewards's BAT microtransactions are a whole 'nother level of craziness. If we're just using BAT within the Brave ecosystem - receiving it from ads and tipping/auto-contributing it back to publishers - does it ever enter the world of "capital assets" from my perspective as a user? If so, how the heck do I compute my cost basis? How on earth do I know how my BAT balance breaks down in terms of amounts received on particular days, which I absolutely need to know if I'm going to look up BAT/USD exchange rates online to compute cost basis information? Brave currently doesn't provide any sort of "wallet statement" showing transactions in or out of the browser on a date-stamped basis. I know that's planned for "the future", but that doesn't exactly help me for doing my 2019 taxes.
I realize that Brave cannot give "tax advise" per se, ad nauseum. But surely Brave has done some thinking about the tax implications of BAT/Brave Rewards for ordinary users, versus just saying "have fun explaining this to the IRS" - right? We know that Brave can and does make legal statements about what they believe, as a company based on the advice of their corporate counsel, the legal status of BAT is (see e.g. this answer in the official FAQ).
That, of course, doesn't guarantee that the government will see it that way (or that a judge will), but it's at least helpful to know "some professional lawyers spent a lot of time studying this and think the law says X", because that's a heck of a lot more than us randos on the Internet can guess at. At least if we have some consistent guidance, we can know what our story should be to the IRS and keep it straight, because otherwise we're at the mercy of whatever some auditor or administrative law judge might feel like. Maybe they won't go after most small-fry Brave users today, but you can bet they'll demand answers going back years into the past if one of those users were to become rich, or politically active, or otherwise interesting to the IRS at some point in the future. Taxes, after all, are the one area of the law where citizens are for practical purposes considered guilty (or at least, "liable to pay whatever the IRS demands") until proven innocent. (Sad, but too true.)
My case is the simplest possible one for a Brave Rewards user: I'm a resident U.S. citizen who's never "cashed out" my BAT, I'm not a "publisher" or "creator", I haven't received tips, and I'm not verified with Uphold (couldn't if I wanted to, since they're not licensed in my state). I've only ever made four small tips totaling 40.0 BAT with the initial grant I got from the User Growth Pool when installing Brave (because it was going to expire); I've been hanging onto my non-UGP earnings in the hopes that some of my favorite websites/creators will eventually become verified and I can start spreading the wealth around in a more meaningful way than just dumping it on the 1 or 2 sites I visit that are yet verified.
My questions are thus:
1) Is the BAT I receive from Brave Rewards considered to be a capital asset if I'm not holding it as an investment but just leaving it in the browser to be used as intended there (as a way of funneling ad proceeds from advertisers to publishers)? Does it matter if it stays in the browser and never gets withdrawn to an Uphold account? (e.g. does it then just qualify as "internal functionality of the web browser" and not a meaningful valuable thing I can put a dollar amount on, like a McDonalds Monopoly token with a "cash value" of $0.0001?)
2) If my BAT is considered a capital asset, how do I compute my cost basis for income (and future capital gains/losses) purposes? Is every single microtransaction an "income" transaction with its own separate cost basis that I have to track day-by-day? Or is income only realized when Brave deposits my earnings to my browser on the 5th of the month? Or does it only count if/when I connect an Uphold account and "cash out"?
3) Do I have to answer "Yes" to the new 1040 question asking "did you receive, sell, send, exchange, or otherwise acquire any financial interest in any virtual currency"? (I haven't touched any cryptocurrency in my life besides what I've gotten from Brave Rewards.) Is BAT a "virtual currency" when used strictly within the context of Brave Rewards, or is it something more along the lines of spendable XP points in a video game which have no value (for me, at least) outside that system?
4) If I have to do detailed cost basis reporting, is there any way I can get my Brave browser to cough up some sort of datestamped transaction history for my Rewards? I realize there's no official UI yet, but is there an internal database or something I can dump? (I'm a professional software developer so I'm willing to "get my hands dirty". Heck, I'd be willing to fire up a debugger on a core dump of the browser if that'll help...better that than being liable for tax fraud...)
5) If all else fails, can I escape this blooming mess by just turning off Brave Rewards, forgetting my wallet key (which I've never backed up), bit bucketing the BAT I've so patiently earned over the last year, and never looking back? Is it too late to do so since I've already received the BAT in tax year 2019 (regardless of what I might do with it in 2020, including thus throwing it away)? I realize that in practice I could probably do so and get away with it, but I want to be right with the law here. After all, even if I report nothing on my 2019 tax return regarding crypto, the IRS could always find my posts here on Reddit and say "see, we have proof that you used Brave Rewards in 2019"... Even if I'm a "small fry" at this point in my life that the IRS won't care to go after, I don't want to have a sword of Damocles hanging over my head for them to trigger if and when they feel like it later in life.
Help me my dudes, you're my only hope! ;-) (And I suspect many, many others are quietly freaking out about this too...)
submitted by gemmy0I to BATProject [link] [comments]

Economic Stimulus and Cryptocurrency (Podcast Episode and Summary)

Hey All!
I’m Isa, producer of The Bitcoin Taxes Podcast and I want to share some valuable information with you. Our newest episode is out today and this time we discuss economic stimulus and cryptocurrency, a topic I think might be of your interest.
Our guest this time is Andrew. Andrew Gordon is a cryptocurrency tax lawyer and the managing attorney of Gordon Law Group. Andrew concentrates on tax controversy and compliance, crypto, and business law – which makes him uniquely suited to discuss how cryptocurrency users may be affected by the economic stimulus options made available in response to COVID-19.
Andrew joins our show to discuss these economic relief measures, and how cryptocurrency traders and businesses can benefit from them. We also discuss what role cryptocurrency has played in this relief response. In addition, Andrew updates us on any changes regarding the FBAR and FATCA filings since his last time on the show.
Episode Page
Audio Only

Episode highlights

FBAR and FATCA Filings: A Reminder (01:35)

Andrew: The FBAR and FATCA are different forms, but both of them are concerned with disclosing the maximum value that you had in the account at any time during the year. They’re not asking for gains or losses – it’s just a disclosure, meaning that there’s no tax calculation. The IRS simply wants to know what is the maximum amount that you had in that account. As long as you disclose and disclose timely, there aren’t any penalties, there isn’t any tax.

Economic Stimulus Programs (05:58)

Andrew: There’s been a lot of different stimulus programs that are available for small businesses, sole proprietors, and so a lot of different people in crypto and even those with businesses outside crypto have been reaching out to us asking: are there different programs that we can take advantage of? How do we take advantage of this? What makes sense for us?
The payroll protection program loans, PPP, is one of the best options out there for small businesses. It really is almost like getting free money or a grant from the government and it allows up to eight weeks of payroll, rent, and utilities to be paid to you in a forgivable loan. So it’s originally a loan, but as long as you use it for those purposes, you don’t just stick the money in your pocket, it is forgiven by the government.
There was originally $349 billion that was approved for this program and within days the money was gone. The SBA ran out of money and news reports suggest that probably about 5 to 10% of the people that wanted funds got it in that initial amount. Unfortunately there seems to be suggestions, as you said, that people that have connections or perhaps even larger companies are getting these loans, but there are things that small businesses, that people listening to this can do and should do, to take advantage of these loans.

Stimulus Options for Crypto Traders (09:37)

Andrew: Some of these other programs do apply to crypto traders. Some of the people out there listening are crypto traders, which is different than [being an] investor.
If you are trading daily, regularly, and it’s really a business, you may be filing your tax return as a trader – which a lot of people may think of themselves as a trader, but in the eyes of the IRS, they’re really investors. This is different because as a trader, you’re essentially a small business and so you’ll be eligible for these same forgivable loans or other loans that any other small business would be eligible for – and you don’t need payroll. That was a big misconception with the payroll protection program loans, [because] it’s got “payroll” in the name.
For people listening out there either as a crypto business, or you just have another business – you’re a schedule C filer on your tax return, and that could be for crypto, or it could be for something else. You can be eligible for a forgivable loan under the payroll protection program. And I’ll fast forward the math for you. If you’re a schedule C business, you can be eligible for a little over $20,000 of forgivable loans. And again, this can be if you’re a crypto trader, it could be if you have a business that’s related to crypto, providing crypto consulting or anything like that, or even something that’s not related to crypto at all.
submitted by IsaN-BitcoinTax to stimuluscheck [link] [comments]

Wall street: Sell your BTC (/facepalm)

Wall street: Sell your BTC (/facepalm) submitted by denkomanceski to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

How to reduce your crypto capital gains by 50%

Not a clickbait title. I've imported my trades in Contracking.info (so they all have transaction IDs) and I've toggled "Group all purchases by day" and "Use Depot separation (tax lots)". The difference between one combination and another was 20% in short-term capital gains. Not bad. We're not even going into FIFO vs. LIFO.
Then I switched from FIFO to LIFO (which is legal since the 2019 guidance, more specifically Q38 & Q39 in this IRS FAQ), for a further reduction of another 30%.
The best combo has been HPFO with "Group all purchases by day". The difference between that and the worst method (LAFO) is 9.5x. As in, financially ruined, vs. actually able to pay.
UPDATE1: At the end of August, Cointracking introduced an "optimized" price calculation method ("OPTI"). It reduces my gains for some years, and increases them in others in which I only had losses. May be worth using it if,
From the CryptoTrader.tax link above,
It’s important to note that the IRS likes to be retroactive when it issues guidance. For instance, Notice 2019-24, which was the most recent guidance released that provided clarity to this specific identification question, was issued in 2019, but still can be applied to transactions that took place before 2019. This means that certain taxpayers who used FIFO in previous years may be able to reasonably go back and amend previous years tax returns using a different, specific identification costing method.
From the IRS FAQ, A39:
You may identify a specific unit of virtual currency either by documenting the specific unit’s unique digital identifier such as a private key, public key, and address, or by records showing the transaction information for all units of a specific virtual currency, such as Bitcoin, held in a single account, wallet, or address.
UPDATE2: I've written a separate post comparing different crypto tax accounting methods after I finished entering all my 14,000+ transactions. HPFO won.
UPDATE3: I've tested HPFO in Cointracking.info vs. HPFO in Bitcoin.tax. Cointracking won by about 10%. I guess this might be due to the "group by day" feature. BUT, Bitcoin.tax won by a landslide overall, because it allows selecting different accounting methods per asset (e.g. HPFO for BTC and AVCO for ETH). This has saved me thousands of dollars compared to Cointracking.info.
TL;DR:
QUESTIONS:
  1. Is all of this right, or am I missing something? 'Cuz it does sound like a bit of a joke that just by toggling some settings in Cointracking, e.g. "Group by day", you can literally end up (not) having to pay tens of thousands of dollars.
  2. Where on your tax return do you report the accounting method used, or how you've identified the trades?
submitted by bigoaktrees to CryptoTax [link] [comments]

MCS | 100% Profitable Bitcoin Trading Method

MCS | 100% Profitable Bitcoin Trading Method
\This post has been written by Hedgehog, an MCS influencer and one of Korea's famous cryptocurrency key opinion leaders.*

https://preview.redd.it/bbpp5xnhqph51.png?width=1024&format=png&auto=webp&s=a20d1f5bafd59fa278e1ed677a510f505efd77df
#Be_a_Trader!
Greetings from MCS, the derivatives trading platform where traders ALWAYS come first.

Cryptocurrency traders are realizing valuable profits through intense trading in their own way. The strategy I am going to share with you is not complicated and may not be the best strategy, but it is a way to trade Bitcoin that is 100% profitable.

🎯 What are Funding Fees?


https://preview.redd.it/4u0f9vniqph51.png?width=1302&format=png&auto=webp&s=a6d77da5f4930a7699b730d57096a7248dd2a907
If you want to trade in bitcoin with 100% profitability, you must first understand the concept of funding fees of perpetual contracts. Due to the nature of Bitcoin perpetual contracts, as it it is a futures product with no expiration date, the gap between the spot price and contract price is closely maintained through funding fees. In simple terms, the funding fee is paid or received once every 8 hours each day to prevent the price of the MCS BTC/USDT perpetual contracts from diverging excessively from the spot price by that can occur due to higher demands in shorts or longs.
For more details regarding funding fees, please find the helpful links below.
Funding Overview : https://help.mycoinstory.com/hc/en-us/articles/360041059811-Funding-Overview

🎯 Bitcoin Trading Strategy with 100% Profitability


https://preview.redd.it/k2g3j0ajqph51.png?width=1300&format=png&auto=webp&s=f51122288180606dd46c3a4b0cfc7af2ebd844d0
Once MCS traders have a complete understanding of funding fees, you can start trading Bitcoin with 100% profit. This trading strategy is called the 1x Short Strategy. Due to the nature of the Bitcoin perpetual contract inverse product, if I take a 1x short position, my bitcoin quantity will vary depending on the bitcoin price, but strangely my assets will remain constant. In this situation, if you receive funding fees, you will continue to accumulate huge interest.
If you are new to the 1x short strategy, you may have not resonated with the details above. I will now explain the details one by one below.

👉 How Can My Assets Be The Same When The Bitcoin Quantity Fluctuates?


https://preview.redd.it/svtr2hwjqph51.png?width=1386&format=png&auto=webp&s=3a252e579956ea055ee3d97e270191b0edb20526
The above chart is a shows the BTC profit and loss when entering the 1x short position with 1 BTC at 10,000 dollars (blue line) and holding 1 BTC as it is (red line). When 1 BTC is held as it is, the amount of BTC does not change depending on the price change. However, if I took a 1x short position with 1 BTC for 10,000 dollars, my BTC profit or loss will fluctuate as shown in the in the blue line according to the change in BTC price. You don't have to worry too much if a 1x short position generates BTC profit or loss. Let's look at the chart below.

https://preview.redd.it/3vclmzhkqph51.png?width=1388&format=png&auto=webp&s=9a45d517a0264e8d215d94e4ca95877e8514630a
In the chart above, the blue line is a position of 1x short with 1 BTC at 10,000 dollars, and the red line is just holding 1 BTC. In this chart, you can see how the value of the asset changes according to the price change. In a glance, you can see that the value of 1 BTC changes according to the price changes. Surprisingly, the blue 1x short position line stays stable in value.
I believe that the more experienced MCS traders realized why the value of the 1x short remained constant. However if you encountered this for the first time, it may be a little difficult to understand. For everyone who did not completely understand, I will explain the 1x short strategy with an example.
💡 Example:
Suppose Hedgehog has 1 BTC in his MCS account and the current BTC price is $10,000. Hedgehog entered 10,000 short contracts with 1x leverage at $10,000 using 1 BTC as margin. Then this can be organized as follows.
Hedgehog's Original Capital = 1BTC Hedgehog's Original Fiat Capital = $10,000
Over time, the price of Bitcoin has reached $15,000. Many traders believe that for a short position, if the price increases, there will be a loss. However there is an exception for 1x short positions. Hedgehog's BTC quantity and asset value can be summarized as follows.
Short Position PNL Equation = (1/Average Closing Price - 1/Average Entry Price) * Quantity
As time has passed, the Bitcoin price is assumed to be $15,000, so the average end price = $15,000
Since Hedgehog entered 10,000 short contracts at $10,000 with 1x leverage, average entry price = $10,000, contract quantity = 10,000 contracts
If substituted, (1/15000 - 1/10000) * 10000 = -0.33333333BTC Hedgehog's loss in BTC is -0.33333333 BTC.
Hedgehog's current BTC Holdings = 1BTC - 0.33333333BTC = 0.66666667BTC
Hedgehog's Asset Value = 0.66666667BTC * $15,000 = $10,000.00005
Wait What‼️ Although the amount of BTC decreased, the price of bitcoin increased by the amount of lost BTC, and the asset value of Hedgehog remained the same.‼️
It is the same in the scenario when the bitcoin price falls. In the case of a 1x short position, if the bitcoin price falls, the amount of BTC increases accordingly, but the bitcoin price decreases, so the asset value of Hedgehog remains at about $10,000. Do you now understand how the 1x short strategy freezes the asset value?
Let's move onto the 2nd question.

👉 But Receiving Funding Fees For Short Position Isn't Guaranteed

If you have clearly established the concept of Funding Fee, you may think "Funding isn't always paid by longs". Funding fees are in some cases paid by longs and some cases paid by shorts. However, if you look at the major cryptocurrency derivatives exchanges Bitmex, Bybit, and MCS, if 90 funding fees are settled per month, more than 95% of them are statistically paid by long positions.

https://preview.redd.it/1x4ruzfmqph51.png?width=1063&format=png&auto=webp&s=941a7baa05ba76883315210276d94d42498f66bc

https://preview.redd.it/huecvdsnqph51.png?width=1066&format=png&auto=webp&s=a1c376f071f5a47c010164c0309a962a474b38ce
If you look at the two tables above, it shows the funding settlement history of BTC/USDT Perpetual Contracts on MCS. Since the first launch of MCS on June 15, the funding fee has been settled about 171 times. If you don't believe my words, you can check the MCS funding details directly through the link below.
MCS Funding Details : https://mycoinstory.com/contract/funding-history

https://preview.redd.it/ruzfyjioqph51.png?width=2324&format=png&auto=webp&s=97a3e5d9c87ce79f75411c9ee7c1178e379ae7da
Some of the world's major banks already have zero interest rates, and many are heading towards zero interest. The Korean bank installments are also 3-4% per year at best, and if you do not pay installments for a long time, you will also have to pay taxes. So I started to take a 1x short installment at MCS. In addition, since the interest on the funding fee comes in every 8 hours, real-time compounding is also possible.

https://preview.redd.it/i6oir60pqph51.png?width=2070&format=png&auto=webp&s=165e22eb6fbaeb6eb71dd2f8f5a3b19a0098750d
In particular, if you look at the funding history on July 28th, you have received an interest of 0.22% in one day. To expand the timeframe, that would be 6.6% of interest for the entire month and 79.2% per year!!! 79.2% INTEREST!! Moreover, if you keep increasing your 1x short position with real-time compounding, this is a risk-free, unconditional way to trade Bitcoin.
Try risk-free trading after familiarizing yourself with the 1x short strategy.

I am a Bitcoin margin trader, Hedgehog. Thank you for reading this post.
\For convenience purposes, trading fees and withdrawal fees are not included in the example of 1x short strategy in this article. The captured image of is an account Hedgehog actually holds with the 1x short savings.*

🔸 MCS Official Website : https://mycoinstory.com
🔸 MCS Telegram : https://t.me/mycoinstory_en

Traders ALWAYS come first on MCS.
Thank you.

MCS Official Twitter (EN): https://twitter.com/mycoinstory_mcs
MCS Official Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MyCoinStory.official
submitted by MyCoinStory to MyCoinStory [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Crypto-Currency: A Guide to Common Tax Situations

STATUS: Majority of questions have been answered. If yours got missed, please feel free to post it again.
Introduction
All,
Based on the rapid increase in popularity and price of bitcoin and other crypto currencies (particularly over the past year), I expect that lots of people have questions about how crypto currency will impact their taxes. This thread attempts to address several common issues. I'm posting similar versions of it here, in several major crypto subs, and eventually in the weekly "tax help" threads personalfinance runs.
I'd like to thank the /personalfinance mod team and the /tax community for their help with this thread and especially for reading earlier versions and offering several valuable suggestions/corrections.
This thread is NOT an endorsement of crypto currency as an investing strategy. There is a time and a place to debate the appropriateness of crypto as part of a diversified portfolio - but that time is not now and that place is not here. If you are interested in the general consensus of this sub on investing, I would urge you to consult the wiki while keeping in mind the general flowchart outlining basic steps to get your finances in order.
Finally, please note that this thread attempts to provide information about your tax obligations as defined by United States law (and interpreted by the IRS under the direction of the Treasury Department). I understand that a certain portion of the crypto community tends to view crypto as "tax free" due to the (actual and perceived) difficulty for the IRS to "know" about the transactions involved. I will not discuss unlawfully concealing crypto gains here nor will I suggest illegal tax avoidance activities.
The Basics
This section is best for people that don't understand much about taxes. It covers some very basic tax principles. It also assumes that all you did during the year was buy/sell a single crypto currency.
Fundamentally, the IRS treats crypto not as money, but as an asset (investment). While there are a few specific "twists" when it comes to crypto, when in doubt replace the word "crypto" with the word "stock" and you will get a pretty good idea how you should report and pay tax on crypto.
The first thing you should know is that the majority of this discussion applies to the taxes you are currently working on (2017 taxes). The tax bill that just passed applies to 2018 taxes (with a few very tiny exceptions), which most people will file in early 2019.
In general, you don't have to report or pay taxes on crypto currency holdings until you "cash out" all or part of your holdings. For now, I'm going to assume that you cash out by selling them for USD; however, other forms of cashing out will be covered later.
When you sell crypto, you report the difference between your basis (purchase price) and proceeds (sale price) on Schedule D. Your purchase price is commonly referred to as your basis; while the two terms don't mean exactly the same thing, they are pretty close to one another (in particular, there are three two ways to calculate your basis - your average cost, a first-in, first-out method, and a "specific identification" method. See more about these here and here). EDIT - you may not use average cost method with crypto - see here. If you sell at a gain, this gain increases your tax liability; if you sell at a loss, this loss decreases your tax liability (in most cases). If you sell multiple times during the year, you report each transaction separately (bad news if you trade often) but get to lump all your gains/losses together when determining how the trades impact your income.
One important thing to remember is that there are two different types of gains/losses from investments - short term gains (if you held an asset for one year or less) and long term gains (over one year; i.e. one year and one day). Short term gains are taxed at your marginal income rate (basically, just like if you had earned that money at a job) while long term gains are taxed at lower rates.
For most people, long term capital gains are taxed at 15%. However, if you are in the 10% or 15% tax bracket, congrats - your gains (up to the maximum amount of "unused space" in your bracket) are tax free! If you are in the 25%, 28%, 33%, or 35% bracket, long term gains are taxed at 15%. If you are in the 39.6% bracket, long term gains are taxed at 20%. Additionally, there is an "extra" 3.8% tax that applies to gains for those above $200,000/$250,000 (single/married). The exact computation of this tax is a little complicated, but if you are close to the $200,000 level, just know that it exists.
Finally, you should know that I'm assuming that you should treat your crypto gains/losses as investment gains/losses. I'm sure some people will try and argue that they are really "day traders" of crypto and trade as a full time job. While this is possible, the vast majority of people don't qualify for this status and you should really think several times before deciding you want to try that approach on the IRS.
"Cashing Out" - Trading Crypto for Goods/Services
I realize that not everyone that "cashes out" of crypto does so by selling it for USD. In fact, I understand that some in the crypto community view the necessity of cashing out itself as a type of myth. In this section, I discuss what happens if you trade your crypto for basically anything that isn't cash (minor sidenote - see next section for a special discussion on trading crypto for crypto; i.e. buying altcoins with crypto).
The IRS views trading crypto for something of value as a type of bartering that must be included in income. From the IRS's perspective, it doesn't matter if you sold crypto for cash and bought a car with that cash or if you just traded crypto directly for the car - in both cases, the IRS views you as having sold your crypto. This approach isn't unique to crypto - it works the same way if you trade stock for something.
This means that if you do trade your crypto for "stuff", you have to report every exchange as a sale of your crypto and calculate the gain/loss on that sale, just as if you had sold the crypto for cash.
Finally, there is one important exception to this rule. If you give your crypto away to charity (one recognized by the IRS; like a 501(c)(3) organization), the IRS doesn't make you report/pay any capital gains on the transaction. Additionally, you still get to deduct the value of your donation on the date it was made. Now, from a "selfish" point of view, you will always end up with more money if you sell the crypto, pay the tax, and keep the rest. But, if you are going to make a donation anyway, especially a large one, giving crypto where you have a big unrealized/untaxed gain is a very efficient way of doing so.
"Alt Coins" - Buying Crypto with Crypto
The previous section discusses what happens when you trade crypto for stuff. However, one thing that surprises many people is that trading crypto for crypto is also a taxable event, just like trading crypto for a car. Whether you agree with this position or not, it makes a lot of sense once you realize that the IRS doesn't view crypto as money, but instead as an asset. So to the IRS, trading bitcoin for ripple isn't like trading dollars for euros, but it is instead like trading shares of Apple stock for shares of Tesla stock.
Practically, what this means is that if you trade one crypto for another crypto (say BTC for XRP just to illustrate the point), the IRS views you as doing the following:
  • Selling for cash the amount of BTC you actually traded for XRP.
  • Owing capital gains/losses on the BTC based on its selling price (the fair market value at the moment of the exchange) and your purchase price (basis).
  • Buying a new investment (XRP) with a cost basis equal to the amount the BTC was worth when you exchanged them.
This means that if you "time" your trade wrong and the value of XRP goes down after you make the exchange, you still owe tax on your BTC gain even though you subsequently lost money. The one good piece of news in this is that when/if you sell your XRP (or change it back to BTC), you will get a capital loss for the value that XRP dropped.
There is one final point worth discussing in this section - the so called "like kind exchange" rules (aka section 1031 exchange). At a high level, these rules say that you can "swap" property with someone else without having to pay taxes on the exchange as long as you get property in return that is "like kind". Typically, these rules are used in real estate transactions. However, they can also apply to other types of transactions as well.
While the idea is simple (and makes it sound like crypto for crypto should qualify), the exact rules/details of this exception are very fact specific. Most experts (including myself, but certainly not calling myself an expert) believe that a crypto for crypto swap is not a like kind exchange. The recently passed tax bill also explicitly clarifies this issue - starting in 2018, only real estate qualifies for like kind exchange treatment. So, basically, the vast majority of evidence suggests that you can't use this "loophole" for 2017; however, there is a small minority view/some small amount of belief that this treatment would work for 2017 taxes and it is worth noting that I'm unaware of any court cases directly testing this approach.
Dealing with "Forks"
Perhaps another unpleasant surprise for crypto holders is that "forks" to create a new crypto also very likely generate a taxable event. The IRS has long (since at least the 1960s) held that "found" money is a taxable event. This approach has been litigated in court and courts have consistently upheld this position; it even has its own cool nerdy tax name - the "treasure trove" doctrine.
Practically, what this means is that if you owned BTC and it "forked" to create BCH, then the fair market value of the BCH you received is considered a "treasure trove" that must be reported as income (ordinary income - no capital gain rates). This is true whether or not you sold your BCH; if you got BCH from a fork, that is a taxable event (note - I'll continue using BTC forking to BCH in this section as an example, but the logic applies to all forks).
While everything I've discussed up to this point is pretty clearly established tax law, forks are really where things get messy with taxes. Thus, the remainder of this section contains more speculation than elsewhere in this post - the truth is that while the idea is simple (fork = free money = taxable), the details are messy and other kinds of tax treatment might apply to forks.
One basic practical problem with forks is that the new currency doesn't necessarily start trading immediately. Thus, you may have received BCH before there was a clear price or market for it. Basically, you owe tax on the value of BCH when you received it, but it isn't completely clear what that value was. There are several ways you can handle this; I'll list them in order from most accurate to least accurate (but note that this is just my personal view and there is ongoing disagreement on this issue with little/no authoritative guidance).
  • Use a futures market to determine the value of the BCH - if reliable sources published realistic estimates of what BCH will trade for in the future once trading begins, use this estimate as the value of your BCH. Pros/cons - futures markets are, in theory, pretty accurate. However, if they are volatile/subject to manipulation, they may provide an incorrect estimate of the true value of BCH. It would suck to use the first futures value published only to have that value plummet shortly thereafter, leaving you to pay ordinary income tax but only have an unrealized capital loss.
  • Wait until an exchange starts trading BCH; use the actual ("spot" price) as the value. Pros/cons - spot prices certainly reflect what you could have sold BCH for; however, it is possible that the true value of the coin was highelower when you received it as compared to when it started trading on the exchange. Thus this method seems less accurate to me than a futures based approach, but it is still certainly fairly reasonable.
  • Assume that the value is $0. This is my least preferred option, but there is still a case to be made for it. If you receive something that you didn't want, can't access, can't sell, and might fail, does it have any value? I believe the answer is yes (maybe not value it perfectly, but value it somewhat accurately), but if you honestly think the answer is no, then the correct tax answer would be to report $0 in income from the fork. The IRS would be most likely to disagree with this approach, especially since it results in the least amount of income reported for the current year (and the most favorable rates going forward). Accordingly, if you go this route, make extra sure you understand what it entails.
Note, once you've decided what to report as taxable income, this amount also becomes your cost basis in the new crypto (BCH). Thus, when you ultimately sell your BCH (or trade it for something else as described above), you calculate your gain/loss based on what you included in taxable income from the fork.
Finally, there is one more approach to dealing with forks worth mentioning. A fork "feels" a lot like a dividend - because you held BTC, you get BCH. In a stock world, if I get a cash dividend because I own the stock, that money is not treated as a "treasure trove" and subject to ordinary income rates - in most cases, it is a qualified dividend and subject to capital gain rates; in some cases, some types of stock dividends are completely non taxable. This article discusses this idea in slightly more detail and generally concludes that forks should not be treated as a dividend. Still, I would note that I'm unaware of any court cases directly testing this theory.
Ultimately, this post is supposed to be practical, so let me make sure to leave you with two key thoughts about the taxation of forks. First, I believe that the majority of evidence suggests that forks should be treated as a "treasure trove" and reported as ordinary income based on their value at creation and that this is certainly the "safest" option. Second, out of everything discussed in this post, I also believe that the correct taxation of forks is the murkiest and most "up for debate" area. If you are interested in a more detailed discussion of forks, see this thread for a previous version of this post discussing it at even more length and the comments for a discussion of this with the tax community.
Mining Crypto
Successfully mining crypto coins is a taxable event. Depending on the amount of effort you put into mining, it is either considered a hobby or a self-employment (business) activity. The IRS provides the following list of questions to help decide the correct classification:
  • The manner in which the taxpayer carries on the activity.
  • The expertise of the taxpayer or his advisors.
  • The time and effort expended by the taxpayer in carrying on the activity.
  • Expectation that assets used in activity may appreciate in value.
  • The success of the taxpayer in carrying on other similar or dissimilar activities.
  • The taxpayer’s history of income or losses with respect to the activity.
  • The amount of occasional profits, if any, which are earned.
If this still sounds complicated, that's because the distinction is subject to some amount of interpretation. As a rule of thumb, randomly mining crypto on an old computer is probably a hobby; mining full time on a custom rig is probably a business.
In either event, you must include in income the fair market value of any coins you successfully mine. These are ordinary income and your basis in these coins is their fair market value on the date they were mined. If your mining is a hobby, they go on line 21 (other income) and any expenses directly associated with mining go on schedule A (miscellaneous subject to 2% of AGI limitation). If your mining is a business, income and expenses go on schedule C.
Both approaches have pros and cons - hobby income isn't subject to the 15.3% self-employment tax, only normal income tax, but you get fewer deductions against your income and the deductions you get are less valuable. Business income has more deductions available, but you have to pay payroll (self-employment) tax of about 15.3% in addition to normal income tax.
What if I didn't keep good records? Do I really have to report every transaction?
One nice thing about the IRS treating crypto as an asset is that we can look at how the IRS treats people that "day trade" stock and often don't keep great records/have lots of transactions. While you need to be as accurate as possible, it is ok to estimate a little bit if you don't have exact records (especially concerning your cost basis). You need to put in some effort (research historical prices, etc...) and be reasonable, but the IRS would much rather you do a little bit of reasonable estimation as opposed to just not reporting anything. Sure, they might decide to audit you/disagree with some specifics, but you earn yourself a lot of credit if you can show that you honestly did the best you reasonably could and are making efforts to improve going forward.
However, concerning reporting every transaction - yes, sorry, it is clear that you have to do this, even if you made hundreds or thousands of them. Stock traders have had to go through this for many decades, and there is absolutely no reason to believe that the IRS would accept anything less from the crypto community. If you have the records or have any reasonable way of obtaining records/estimating them, you must report every transaction.
What if I don't trust you?
Well, first let me say that I can't believe you made it all the way down here to this section. Thanks for giving me an honest hearing. I would strongly encourage you to go read other well-written, honest guides. I'll link to some I like (both more technical IRS type guides and more crypto community driven guides). While a certain portion of the crypto community seems to view one of the benefits of crypto as avoiding all government regulation (including taxes), I've been pleasantly surprised to find that many crypto forums contain well reasoned, accurate tax guides. While I may not agree with 100% of their conclusions, that likely reflects true uncertainty around tax law that is fundamentally complex rather than an attempt on either end to help individuals unlawfully avoid taxes.
IRS guides
Non-IRS guides
submitted by Mrme487 to personalfinance [link] [comments]

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